This week’s type crush: Lust

I can’t keep my eyes off this appropriately named serif designed by Neil Summerour and published by Positype in 2012. Some standouts for me are the numerals and the ampersand variants. Beautiful!

From the description on MyFonts : “WARNING! I cannot stress this enough. Please know what you are getting into with this typeface. Like a supermodel, it can’t be squeezed into every situation. It needs room and size to breathe. The regular weights can support 36-point or higher settings, whereas the display weights shine above 72-point (preferably 100-point).”

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Judging books by their covers

I have tremendous respect for book design and its designers. I think most people underestimate the process and effort it takes to produce a truly great cover—it can be a rigorous exercise in efficiency of type and image that must check the boxes on several demands. At a bare minimum, it should conceptually capture the essence of the story within and ideally do it at a glance. It also needs to be visually compelling so that it captures people’s attention as they browse hundreds of other covers on display. When this combination of things occurs, the results can be stunning.

The New York Times recently posted their top picks for the Best Book Covers of 2014. You can see a few below but be sure to check out the article on the NYT website to see the entire list.

Design by Peter Mendelsund. “Silence Once Begun” by Jesse Ball.

Design by Peter Mendelsund.
“Silence Once Begun” by Jesse Ball.

Design by Oliver Munday. “The Silent History” by Eli Horowitz, Matthew Derby and Kevin Moffett.

Design by Oliver Munday.
“The Silent History” by Eli Horowitz, Matthew Derby and Kevin Moffett.

Design by Rodrigo Corral and Tyler Comrie. “Area X — The Southern Reach Trilogy — Annihilation, Authority, and Acceptance” by Jeff Vandermeer.

Design by Rodrigo Corral and Tyler Comrie.
“Area X — The Southern Reach Trilogy — Annihilation, Authority, and Acceptance” by Jeff Vandermeer.

General Dynamics Space Cards

Wow. I can’t believe I haven’t seen these until now! A set of playing cards from General Dynamics that feature crazy cool illustrations as well as Erik Nitsche’s logo design for GD. Manufactured by National Periodical Publications, Inc in 1964. Would love to learn more about these if anyone has additional info. Would also like to get my hands on a set...

*drool*

LAND in Japan

I’ve been following the work of Ryan Rhodes and Caleb Owen Everitt of LAND for quite some time now. Their work is exceptional—raw, free and familiar in a way that goes back far beyond your own time on this earth. Not only that, but they are simply impossible to ignore if you live in Austin, TX as you can see the expert result of their hands on several local businesses such as Easy Tiger and Flat Track Coffee.

As a motorcyclist, some of their work I am most interested in is the branding and illustration for Deus Ex Machina, an Australian-born custom motorcycle and merchandise brand.

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Ryan and Caleb were in Tokyo this past Monday for an event at the Harajuku Deus Ex Machina location exhibiting their work. All I’ve managed to scrape together is a few pics posted on their Instagram feed. Hoping to see more soon.

Brains

I heard a bizarre story on public radio this morning while driving to work. It was a story about a collection of brains, each one carefully preserved in a glass jar and collecting dust in a basement at the University of Texas at Austin. These particular specimens—roughly 100 in all dating from the 1950s to the 1970s—are from the patients of the once named Texas State Lunatic Asylum.

“For decades, a rare collection of human remains sat in a basement at the University of Texas at Austin. Now, it is getting renewed attention, thanks in part, to Austin photographer Adam Voorhes.

Of course I had to check out the photos. Whoa. Creepy...strange...but undeniably fascinating.

See more photos and read the entire story

Add to cart - Monotype relaunches The Recorderd

Looking forward to getting my hands on the recently re-imagined Recorder magazine from Monotype. First published in 1902, The Recorder was originally used to showcase new developments in typography but this time around, the magazine’s focus is exploring type’s role in a wider cultural context. The bold and beautiful redesign was led by Luke Tonge from Life Agency.

Image by Luke Tonge

Image by Luke Tonge

One of the more drool-worthy teasers I’ve seen is this collection of hand drawn and collaged typography by Stephen Smith. Love.

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This 100+ page first issue is a limited print run. Get one before they’re gone!