New in my bookshelf - Lance Wyman: The Monograph

So pleased with this standout volume from Unit Editions. Lance Wyman: The Monograph showcases the extensive career of a truly prolific graphic designer.

From the publisher:

This monograph is the first major publication devoted to Lance Wyman’s entire output. It showcases the achievements of a long and productive career, from his early work for General Motors, through his iconic designs for the Mexico 68 Olympics, to the Minnesota Zoo and his more recent projects.

Read more and see pages from the book.


Judging books by their covers

I have tremendous respect for book design and its designers. I think most people underestimate the process and effort it takes to produce a truly great cover—it can be a rigorous exercise in efficiency of type and image that must check the boxes on several demands. At a bare minimum, it should conceptually capture the essence of the story within and ideally do it at a glance. It also needs to be visually compelling so that it captures people’s attention as they browse hundreds of other covers on display. When this combination of things occurs, the results can be stunning.

The New York Times recently posted their top picks for the Best Book Covers of 2014. You can see a few below but be sure to check out the article on the NYT website to see the entire list.

Design by Peter Mendelsund. “Silence Once Begun” by Jesse Ball.

Design by Peter Mendelsund.
“Silence Once Begun” by Jesse Ball.

Design by Oliver Munday. “The Silent History” by Eli Horowitz, Matthew Derby and Kevin Moffett.

Design by Oliver Munday.
“The Silent History” by Eli Horowitz, Matthew Derby and Kevin Moffett.

Design by Rodrigo Corral and Tyler Comrie. “Area X — The Southern Reach Trilogy — Annihilation, Authority, and Acceptance” by Jeff Vandermeer.

Design by Rodrigo Corral and Tyler Comrie.
“Area X — The Southern Reach Trilogy — Annihilation, Authority, and Acceptance” by Jeff Vandermeer.

Add to cart - Monotype relaunches The Recorderd

Looking forward to getting my hands on the recently re-imagined Recorder magazine from Monotype. First published in 1902, The Recorder was originally used to showcase new developments in typography but this time around, the magazine’s focus is exploring type’s role in a wider cultural context. The bold and beautiful redesign was led by Luke Tonge from Life Agency.

Image by Luke Tonge

Image by Luke Tonge

One of the more drool-worthy teasers I’ve seen is this collection of hand drawn and collaged typography by Stephen Smith. Love.

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This 100+ page first issue is a limited print run. Get one before they’re gone!